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20130121
20130129
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the commission. >> president carter appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the powe
of linking education with worse force development. making the united states more economically competitive by investing in community colleges, by improving our education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that he can lead four years from now with a america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity. >> i have to check in with the reporters around town. brooke baldwin. can you hear me? >> reporter: you hear correctly. i can barely hear myself speak. i'm a southern girl. it's my perfect place. they're playing a very significant song right now. this is simple plman. i was talking to them backstage. they say this is the one song they sing. they sing at concerts like this all the time. we have heroes in the room. our men and women in military. many of them in wheelchairs to my right who have made it out here. they are trying to move forward. the guys in the band say the song just resonates. neez men a these men and women are simple men and women. yourself missing out. >> you look absolutely the part in that dazzling outfit. let me move to anot
in terms of linking education with workforce development. making the united states more economically competitive in the 21st century global economy investing in community colleges, improving the education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that, he can leave four years from now with an america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity in the 21st century. >> wait a moment. we have to check in with reporters around the town now. brooke baldwin at the red, white and blue ball. brooke, can you hear me? you are with military leaders and lynyrd skynyrd, i hear. >> you hear correctly, my friend. i can barely hear myself speak and so glad you came to me. i don't know if you can hear. i'm a southern girl. i'm in my perfect place hearing the southern rock band lynyrd skynyrd. playing a significant song. this is "simple man." i was talking to them backstage and they said they sing at concerts all the time. that is hero's red, white and ball here in washington. the men and women of military, many of these guys just in wheelchairs to my right
education. got a new department of education. >> host: at what point do you become for the civil rights commission would become a permanent agency in a sense? >> guest: after the first year , what the commission did this instead of sitting down seine which is here as a safety valve, they different hearings. the major power the commission had an ipod this in the book continues the most important thing. when it does what it's supposed to do, it will go out and listen to people nobody else will listen to. the civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention. not just local people, but the federal government would write letters. nobody would pay attention. the civil rights commission decided they would go out of that they had decided and they had the power under the statute to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said the reason i want to get it passed by congress to set up an executive orders because my attorney general tells me that's the only way they can subpoena anybody. some people may not want to come to testify, said the commission has the most important
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
sentence. >> that is a concept -- anyway, legislation will be critical. part of our job is to educate congress on what is going on out there. educate the public. we say cyber and everybody's eyes glaze over. i can see it. nonetheless, the call is here. we need to deal with this urgently and imminently because attacks are coming all the time from different sources and take different forms. they are increasing in seriousness and sophistication. >> you mentioned civilian space. there is defense space, the government space than dot com and dot org. that is the civilian space and the overwhelming majority of space. a lot of our temperature is operated by the private sector -- a lot of our infrastructure is operated by the private sector. homeland has jurisdiction uniquely where the pentagon does not. or the nro doesn't over this civilian space. homeland have to be a major player. yet many in the private sector have been saying that homeland does not have the competence to do this job well. do you agree with that? >> no. [laughter] >> that is what is called a delay -- leading cancer. -- tha
said, i'm going to do it in health care, education and energy. now think about that, health care is one-sixth, and then you control the production and the price and you control everything and he tried to with cap and trade but failed. and education is the future. you control the three elements there and you've goten what lennon would call the commanding heights of a post industrial society. that's what he said he wanted to do. but you don't remember this because unlike me, you have real lives, you don't have to watch everything the man says, i do for my sins and they clearly are many, but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase, the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered, but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech when they give out the printed version of it was called the new foundation. he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appalachian, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ide
's about education, about research and development, it's about controlling our energy future. all of these are part of the equation. and we can't just do one piece of it, and we can't let that piece prevent us or become a smoke screen for not acting on the others. so that is the challenge. how do you put that puzzle together, move forward in a balanced way, so we're funding those kinds of priorities that we need to grow? >> it's interesting, doris, as you look at the historical sweep as well. here is a very toxic atmosphere in washington. a carryover of, you know, difficult debates. and the president who's popular, has a unified party, but also seems reluctant to go out on a limb on some big areas where he thinks he's not going to get much cooperation from republicans. >> i'm not sure that's true. i think gun control. he came out with sweeping proposals. i mean, that's certainly out on a limb. you're not going to get a lot of support perhaps from republicans. but his idea, i think, is that if you educate the country -- you know, when he talked to you, he mentioned lincoln's quote.
and celebrate it because it's the bedrock of our country's success. on education, the president of the united states has an opportunity to strengthen our classrooms and recommit to public education in this country, our teachers, so we can compete in a global market. now, for the republicans, they have vilified all of these institutions. they think that tax cuts for the wealthy and deregulation is exactly how we should run the country, and that's it. president obama actually accomplished a heck of a lot in his first term. but there is so much more he can do on a number of important issues facing our country in the second term. we are a center-left country. we are progressive. progressives are in the majority. we have to think like that as a movement. we have to think like that as a people. and the chatter across the street, we learned one thing about those folks during the 2012 election. they lie. they do a pretty good job of it. so when we start going down the road of immigration reform and climate change and fair taxation and public education, we'll get plenty of lies from the right, because
concerned about, people are concerned about health care costs and education costs. and to a lesser extent, when economic growth is stronger as it was later in the bush years maybe they're concerned about issues related to the bottom and so. education and health care and sort of the broader challenge of globalization, those things loom incredibly large and the republican imagination and those are not issues republicans like to talk about. this is where compassion conservatism didn't emerge any backing to emerge in the late 1990s from a period when bill clinton had been something republicans up and down washington for four, six years. and the whole point of bush's him was to craft a republican party that had something to say about education. that's something to say about health care. you can go back and said, i think justifiably, that something like the prescription drugs bill was too big, cost too much, should've bee been paid fn someone been paid for and so wanted you to make similar critiques with no child left behind by the republican party will never get back to the wilderness if it ju
, on your side? >> the strategy on our side is what it has been all along, which is to educate, inform and organize and mobilize people at the grassroots who understand that reproductive freedom and choice is a fundamental right of women and that women's rights are human rights and we have to always be vigilant and fight against those who would take away that right. and i think, you know, when i became president of the organization in 1984-85, the passion was on the anti-abortion side. i think this last election in 2012 shows that the country has moved to understand that reproductive choices, reproductive decision making, is the purview of women. it's a personal, private, intimate right that needs to be outside of the realm of government, and that people voted, women were a factor in the election of president obama this year, and it was in large part because they saw the threat of -- to their rights, their fundamental right to equality, in the threat to their right to choose. >> kate michaelman, thanks so much. we'll be right back. mom's oven-baked tastes straight from the microwave. l
how we can better use those resources not only to support public endeavors like education and public safety and roads, but also of money that could be pumped into the private sector. >> david, if you have another question or comment, we are almost at the end of our time. but we can squeeze one -- ok. i think we have not at all exhausted this topic. we may have exhausted our panelists and some of you. we will return to its. this has been -- at least for a poor country lawyer, a very enlightening discussion of the economic issues. we've not done too much with the politics. i suppose there might be a smidgen of that in some of the decisions that get made over the next month's. let me take this occasion to thank you for a plethora of wonderful questions and for hanging in there in a very difficult topic. think our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only provided us -- thank our friends at the commonwealth fund for not only providing us this topic, but great direction in shaping this program. i would like you to think -- join me in thanking our panel for a terrific discussion. [appl
of education, research and development, innovation energy. there are things we can do about it but we have to do them together as a country. that's our goal. >> i do think it's important to put in context and remember just how dark the days were four years ago and how in the middle of that meltdown, people were thinking about going to caves and getting spam and guns. it was dark. not only the president, but the president working with george w. bush and others really pitched in and had to make very tough decisions and a lot of hard votes that got a lot of people unelected from office to get us through that. >> when we got our first economic briefings, i wanted to get some spam and go into a cave. i know what you're talking about. >> that's why this is such an opportunity, though, for the president right now. the problems we're talking about are structural. they've been there for a long time. this declining middle class has gone on for two decades. it isn't just the recession. that means investing. this is where the problem of the debt comes in. if you're going to get bet
and provide the relief and save the programs and give them some opportunity working through areas on education, hopefully, the white house will finally join us in some of thosests, and there are all kinds of things and workforce training and others that we can find common ground on depending on whether the mood today lasts. >>neil: do you get a sense they are leery, the dims, to go too crazy on spending cuts. the president told president obama he sees it as a health care problem. if they get health care spending under control you may not have to attack some of the other entitlements they charge you are trying to rip apart. what do you say to that, it is almost entirely health care? >> well, there are examples throughout the federal government where the dollars are not spent wisely. we ought to treat it as other people's money because it is the money earned bit taxpayers and we have an obligation to make sure that we don't continue the wasteful ways of washington. we intend in the house of representatives to promote an agenda that allows for getting spending under control, not just in the healt
will do it in health care, education and energy. think about that. health care is one sixth of the economy. energy, you control the production and the pricing and control everything from he tried to with capt. trade and he tried. education is the future. you control those three elements and you have what lenin would call the commanding height of a post industrial society. that is what he said he wanted to do. in fact, you don't remember this because, unlike me, you have real lives for it you don't have to watch everything the man says. i do for my sins and they clearly are mending. [laughter] but he sprinkled that speech and the subsequent speeches until the georgetown speech with a phrase -- the new foundation, which was never picked up on and never remembered. but it was in there. in fact, the name of the speech was called "the new foundation." he already saw himself one month into the presidency as a successor to the new deal and the new frontier. he wanted this appellation, the new foundation, to be what obama is and would be. so it shows you how ideologically ambitious he was from day
to the state of new jersey if they were to reach certain goals on -- for schools. >> education. >> education grants to the state of new jersey and they hit it, $200 million from zuckerberg and $200 million from a matching grant why would liberals not want more of that. >> the reason they pulled it back, they don't want to get him mad. he gives a lot of money to democrats and the stupid thing to do is attack him for doing the fundraiser. >> in the old days you'd call up an yell at them. >> we used to put fire things in the garbage... >> do you want to talk about intolerantly liberals, mark zuckerberg or bobby jindal. >> i want to talk about everything. my theory is the left, holds an axe over the right's head or farr their friends hope to right. it is social acceptance, if you want to go to the right parties, new york city and california and want to be accepted, and avoid ridicule, be like us, it is a form of social bullying and america accepted it because we see cool trumps character and liberals are more intolerant because they have a louder megaphone and, people like me are knuckle-draggin
and pay higher wages and improving education and job training so that more people can get the skills that businesses are looking for. it means reforming our immigration system and keeping our children safe from the menace of gun violence. and it means bringing down our deficit in a balanced way by making necessary reforms and asking every american to pay their fair share. >> meanwhile, republicans stressing their agenda today as well. cutting spending. >> our nation's total debt is now larger than our entire economy. this means that every man, woman and child owes a $53,000 share of this debt. that level of spending is unsustainable. a major credit rating agency has already downgraded our nation's credit once. and if we don't start making some real progress on spending reforms, more downgrades are likely in the near future. >> about eight minutes past the hour now. live look this is happening in washington, d.c. as we speak. this is happening really across the country. one of the main ones, this is a rally for gun control taking place in washington, d.c. people there are rallying for
, an outside moment that would regenerate our interest in research and development and in education and stuff, as had the sputnik launch in the 1957. it may have been to a younger generation it may have been too diffuse, because sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation, but that was pretty clever. but most of his slogans, most of his abilities so far have not, have not really caught on. the first summer he was in washington he said, and it's a strange construct, but he said in august he said this is the time when washington becomes all wee weed up and things are hard to get done. no one really knows what it means, but it's somehow applicable. [laughter] so on that low note, i think i'm going to see if you guys have any questions and want to talk about these things. yes, ma'am. >> i'm surprised that you didn't mention the president that we popularly think are the most eloquent; ronald reagan and john f. kennedy. were they just good at regular words, or did they -- >> oh, no, they had, i mean, john f. kennedy had wonderful phrases, and the new frontier was his. but
to educate us. >> that was well-done. >> alex, you jump in here. parents will take risks with money knowing in the end even if they're not rich when they're old, they will have something so they spend all their money on tuition and raising kids. so i thought that was what he was talking about which is really important about our country. your thoughts, alex? >> i think one of the things that's been underdiscussed in terms of how progressive this message was is the foreign policy piece. advocating for engagement against the backdrop of a hostage situation in algeria is a very firm flag to plant in the ground. to say that as we see al qaeda cells multiplying, taking over a host of failed states in north africa and now west africa. to say these are not our enemies, that we can come in peace, that we can have peaceable relations with evil actors in the world is very much obama 1.0. for him to say that now i thought was really, really remarkable if you're talking about hawk versus dove, progressive versus conservative. >> i thought that was a direct message to the mullahs and to the people of ira
they have in common? they fit the demographics of the obama coalition. how did he win? with college-educated women. with younger voters. with nonwhite voters. he's embracing if you will not only the politics but the policy priorities of his coalition. what else do they have in common? they put pressure, like a sharp thumb, on some key points in a republican coalition that this white house, frankly, thinks is ageing, is increasingly white and is fractured. >> and you're saying you think there's no doubt that that is part of this equation? >> without a doubt. if you heard speaker john boehner just the other day after the inaugural address saying the president is trying to annihilate the republican party. that's a strong word. but does this president see an opportunity? i'd be interested in the congresswoman's opinion. you can't find many democrats who think that president obama worries about the democratic party, 10, 15, 20 years down the road. but you will find a lot of democrats who say if you can turn the obama coalition into a democratic coalition, the democrats will have built in on the n
for education. we also must insure economic development and political progress, political development. these things and these principles are very important, and this is why the arab spring took place at the end of the day. and i believe that such principles are still not respected in our countries, such freedoms are not yet respected. we still have a long way to go. regardless of what the west thinks or does not think, we don't really -- we should not really mind what the west says. the west can speak and say, and we also can speak and say whatever we think. however, i believe that the reform process must start from us, must start from the arab world. so that we would bring back the human dignity to each citizen. we must respect individuals, and we must not force any citizen to do anything that he or she does not want to do. i believe that it's the arab spring happened because of the oppression that we were living under. that oppression took away our freedoms, our liberties, our human rights, and that is why i believe that we need this revolution, we needed this revolution, and we nee
will bankrupt the nation, causing pain to everyone and making it impossible for poorly educated or kiss advantaged whom he sighted to make a living. the president's address was not an urgent call to reform entitlements, provide oversight on economic abuse or even stimulate the economy. none of that was on display. so it is quite clear that the president is willing to go down in history as a crusader for social justice no matter what happens to the economic fabric of the country. he does not want to cut government spending. he does not want to reform entitlements that are now directly threatening the american treasury. unless there is a radical change in the president's thinking, few problems will be solved over the next four years. we'll simply get more of the same. and that's the memo. now for the top story tonight. we begin our coverage of the inauguration by going down to washington and bringing in fox news senior political analyst brit hume. so where am i going wrong here, hume? >> i think you are actually right about his focus on social justice. this is something that's very import
first six months of 1965, medicare, education, voting rights, all the things that we think of really as the great society didn't happen across four years, really just in that first half of one year. the fact that johnson was asking for all those big things together really helped. >> the end of the iraq war was not marked as a massive occasion in this country when it happened. there was some primetime news programs that didn't cover it the day that it happened, the day that was the end of the war. but people, when you ask them broadly in the country, end up ranking ending the war as president obama's greatest single accomplishment in his first four years. what explains the primacy of that in memory, even as it was buried in the news as we went through it? >> well, go back to the democratic primaries of 2008. what was the biggest issue? barack obama probably became the nominee largely because he was against the war at the beginning. hillary clinton was for it. so people obviously noticed the absence of that. but even more than that, i'm sure you're wiser than i was. but four years ago
but that is not stopping a teachers grew from hand-picking bill ayers. he will address teacher educators next month in atlanta. ayers was involved in a townhouse bombing in new york city that left three people dead. >>steve: singer james taylor says he knows what gun owners want. >> i think the majority of us feel strongly, even the majority of gun owners feel strongly that we need to make some sacrifice to our freedoms if that's the way to put it. >>brian: is he wearing scalia's hat? >>steve: taylor made the comment after performing at the inauguration. advocates very concerned about the president's proposal on gun control if you take aspirin, it can triple your chances of going blind. those who take it on a regular basis can cause age related macular degeneration. >>gretchen: they tell you to take it for your heart and blood thinning. >>steve: the low dose. >>gretchen: watch this. a huge lighting fixture falls from above landing on the child during a meet in wisconsin. he had just gotten into position to start up the match again when it happened. luckily he only needed a few stitches. no word on
of no matter your age, education, or experience. this is something you can do. you can literally earn money on your own computer from your own kitchen table 24/7. it makes sense if you are living -- sick i have living paycheck to paycheck, if you are worried about job security or retirement, if your goal has always been to earn extra money from home, part-time or full-time, go to income at home.com. they are they are adding listeners in record numbers, giving away a thousand bucks to somebody for checking them out. that somebody could be you. visit income at home.com. that's incomeathome.com. paul brandus on the president's inauguration. so do you think that some democrats are asking paul, we were talking about the republican crittism. some democrats are asking: are we going to see the delivery to match the promise in the inaugural address? i would have to say probably yes. what's your take? i mean that obama is going to follow through on thesibs. >> i am for the quite so sure. i mean the limitation he faces, the fiscal limitations he faces are going to pr
the president had the courage to put it in there. he has to start being an educator. that's just one of a number of things he did very well in that speech. now jonathan, bill o'reiley, last night, say something that was different. let me play it. >> why are so many americans accepting president obama's vision when less than 30 years ago, president reagan was the political icon? the struggle in america is not between republicans and democrats, it's between us, we the people. you either want freedom or you don't. >> us. we the people. want freedom or we don't. how is what president obama's talking about, social justice and equal pay for women and rights for gays and lesbians. how is this not wanting freedom? i don't understand? that's why i called it different. and the fact that 30 years ago, we saw reagan as an icon means 30 years later that we can't say that we think what the president is saying today is just as important as what people felt about ronald reagan 30 years ago? help me with this, jonathan? >> well, i wish i could get into the mind of bill o'riley and figure out which people is he t
to the state of new jersey if they were to reach certain goals on, for schools. education grants to the state of new jersey. they hit it $200 million from zuckerberg. $200 million comes from a matching grant. why would liberals be so intolerant they don't want more of that? that is something they should want more of. >> bob: the reason they pulled it back is simple. they don't want to get him in trouble because he gives money to democrats. >> dana: in the old days they used to call up and yell at him, right? instead of putting a post up. >> bob: we'd put fire in his car. >> dana: do you want to talk about into janet liberals, mark zuckerberg or bobby jindal? >> greg: i want to talk about everything. >> dana: go ahead. >> greg: my theory is the left used to hold an ax over the right's head or their friends on the right. it's called social acceptance. if you want to go to the right parties. especially in new york city or california, if you want to be accepted and avoid ridicule, be like us. it's a form of social bullying. it has been around forever. weird way america accepted it because we see
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 85 (some duplicates have been removed)